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Turkish Pide Recipe

Turkish Pide Recipe

This Turkish pide recipe (Turkish flatbread) is vegan, fluffy and delicious. Made with a yeast dough that rises twice and brushed with oil – milk mixture and sprinkled with sesame seeds before baking. Tastes great with almost anything, from breakfast to dinner.

A couple of weeks ago, our friends Horst and his wife, Gerda came over for dinner. So I made this Turkish flatbread aka. pide that we had as a starter served with homemade wild pig ham and good quality olive oil from our Italian Easter vacation this year.

Pide is a very important part of Turkish cuisine, just like potatoes in Germany or pasta in Italy. This pide recipe is vegan, easy to follow – no equipment is needed, and yields two beautiful flatbreads – with criss-cross patterns and dimples.


Easy Homemade Turkish Flatbread (Pide)

Yield: 8 Servings
Prep Time: 140 min
Bake Time: 30 min @ 200 °C (392 °F)

Ingredients for Turkish flatbread

  • 600 g (5 cups/ 21.2 oz) plain flour (all purpose flour) plus extra for dusting
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 ½ teaspoons salt
  • 2 tablespoons sunflower oil plus extra for greasing
  • 360 ml (12.2 fl.oz/ 1 ½ cups) lukewarm water
  • 2 ½ teaspoons dry yeast (7 g or 0.25 oz)

You’ll also need:

  • 2 bowls
  • 2 teaspoons milk and 2 teaspoons sunflower oil to brush the breads before baking
  • Sesame seeds, optional
  • parchment papers (2x)
  • 2 baking sheets

How to make Turkish flatbread

Combine all the ingredients in the bowl. Using your hands, mix them together to form a smooth dough.

Lightly flour the surface and knead the dough for at least 10 minutes. (If the dough is too sticky, just oil your hands).

Grease the second clean bowl with oil and then put the dough in it. Cover the bowl with a tea towel and let it rise for about 1 ½ hours at room temperature.

In the meanwhile take two baking sheets and line them with parchment papers. Tip the dough out of the bowl onto a floured working surface. 

Carefully divide it into two equal doughs and shape them into oval-shapes. You want to retain the air bubbles in the doughs intact so that you’ll have a nicely fluffy bread.

  • You could also just bake one huge flatbread, without dividing the dough.

Place each oval shaped bread loaf on a baking sheet lined with a parchment paper. Cover with kitchen towel and let rise for another 20 minutes.

About 10 minutes before the end of the second rise preheat the oven 200 °C (392 °F). After the second rise you can either use your fingertips begin pressing into the dough, gently, to create dimples.

You can also use the back of the knife to cut grid-like pattern on the dough, as shown below.

Next, brush the dough with oil and milk mixture and sprinkle with sesame seeds.

Bake for 15 minutes or until nicely golden brown. My bread with grid – like pattern, was a bit longer in the oven, as a result, it burned slightly, but it was still delicious.

This flatbread can stay fresh up to 3 days. Just wrap it in a plastic, so that it will stay moist.

What to serve with Turkish flatbread

  1. You can have it for breakfast
  2. As starter with red pepper and feta dip or tzatziki 
  3. As a side dish to about everything from chili con carne, eggplant salat, Spanish meatballs in tomato sauce to pork tenderloin with creamy sauce.

Turkish Pide Recipe

This Turkish pide recipe (Turkish flatbread) is vegan, fluffy and delicious. Made with a yeast dough that rises twice and brushed with oil - milk mixture and sprinkled with sesame seeds before baking. Tastes great with almost anything, from breakfast to dinner.
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Rising Time1 hr 5 mins
Total Time2 hrs 5 mins
Course: Appetizer, Breakfast, Side Dish, Snack
Cuisine: European, Turkish
Keyword: BBQ, Doughs, flatbread, Game Day, how to, paleo, pide, Vegan
Servings: 8 Servings
Author: Ester | esterkocht.com

Equipment

  • Baking sheet
  • Parchment paper

Ingredients

  • 600 g/ 5 cups/ 21.2 oz plain flour/ all purpose flour plu extra for dusting
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 ½ teaspoons salt
  • 2  tablespoons sunflower oil plus extra for greasing
  • 360 ml/ 12.2 fl.oz/ 1 ½ cups  lukewarm water
  • 2 ½ teaspoons dry yeast (7 g (0.25 oz)
  • 2 teaspoons milk and sunflower oil to brushbread loaves before baking
  • Sesame seeds optional

Instructions

  • Combine all the ingredients in the bowl. Using your hands, mix them together to form a smooth dough. Lightly flour the surface and knead the dough for at least 10 minutes. (If the dough is too sticky, just oil your hands). Grease the second clean bowl with oil and then put the dough in it. Cover the bowl with a tea towel and let it rise for about 1 ½ hours at room temperature.
  • After the first rice, tip the dough onot a dusted working surface. Carefully divide the dough into two equal doughs and shape them into oval-shapes. You want to retain the air bubbles in the doughs intact so that you’ll have a nicely fluffy bread. You could also just bake one huge flatbread, without dividing the dough.
  • Place each oval shaped bread loaf on a baking sheet lined with a parchment paper. Cover with kitchen towel and let rise for another 20 minutes.
  • About 10 minutes before the end of the second rise preheat the oven 200 °C (392 °F). After the second rise create the desired patterns on the doughs. 
  • Using your fingertips begin pressing into the dough, gently, to create dimples. You can also use the back of the knife to cut criss-cross (grid-like) pattern on the dough. 
  • Brush the flatbreads with oil and milk mixture and sprinkle with sesame seeds. Bake for 15 minutes or until nicely golden brown. 

Notes

  • You could also just bake one huge flatbread, without dividing the dough into two.
  • This bread can stay fresh up to 3 days. Just wrap it in a plastic, so that it will stay moist.

Did you make this Turkish pide recipe recipe? I’d love to hear from you! Simply write a review and add rating to it. 

Recipe Rating




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A_Boleyn

Wednesday 16th of May 2018

Beautiful breads ... similar to Italian focaccia, I think. I made something similar with sourdough.

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